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  1. Yesterday
  2. Looking for a #lowFODMAP dessert? Try our strawberry and chia pudding - full of protein, healthy fats and fibre 🍓 😋 (Recipe serves 4) - When buying almond milk, try and find one that is calcium fortified. Check the nutrition information panel for approx 200-300mg per serve. (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  3. RT @Doctor_Amanda: A gentle reminder to: * Unfurrow your brow * Unclench your jaw * Peel your shoulders down from your ears * Release your fists Notice wherever you’re holding tension in your body & let it go #anxiety #stress #OCD #mentalhealth #COVIDー19 #COVID19 #COVID #ThursdayThoughts (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  4. Katsuja

    IBGuard or other peppermint supplements

    I have tried peppermint capsules earlier, and it was disaster. My intestines felt like inflamed.
  5. Katsuja

    No relief

    I have difficult flare-up as well, for one week now. Started with constipation and changed into diarrhea. Nothing seems to help. I don't mind if it is diarrhea or constipation, the problem affecting me is those very painful sensations, stabbing, cramping, feeling of needles. Only taking Tramal will help with the pain momentarily. Situation is quite bad. I would also need some advice.
  6. Related ArticlesMind-body treatments of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms: An updated meta-analysis. Behav Res Ther. 2019 Nov 12;128:103462 Authors: Shah K, Ramos-Garcia M, Bhavsar J, Lehrer P Abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a widespread chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder having bidirectional comorbidity with psychiatric disorders. This review focuses on psychological treatment of IBS, focusing on symptom severity rather than IBS diagnostic criteria. We chose this dimensional approach in order to assess mind-body effects as an alternative or complement to conventional medical treatment, which focuses on symptom relief. We calculated the effect sizes for various psychosocial-mind-body therapies (MBTs) for IBS symptoms in both children and adults. Therapies included meditation, relaxation, yoga, autogenic training, progressive relaxation, general training in stress coping, hypnotherapy, biofeedback, psycho-education, psychodynamic psychotherapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy. We performed a meta-regression analyses and mixed effects contrasts to find various outcome differences, and we analyzed their relative efficacy in both children and adults. We found 53 studies in 50 reports describing randomized controlled trials. Medium to high effect sizes were found across all methods compared with various controls, with possibly higher effects for children. We found no systematic differences among treatment methods. Meta-regression analyses showed no significant effect for the presence of psychophysiological training, meditation or explicit exposure procedures as treatment components, although most MBTs include exposure as a nonexplicit treatment characteristic, and many relaxation techniques have meditative characteristics. We conclude that there is considerable evidence that an array of mind-body and other psychological therapies can be effective complements to medical treatment for IBS symptom severity, with little evidence for relative superiority of any particular approach. We suggest that the various methods may operate through different mechanisms. PMID: 32229334 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] View the full article
  7. Related ArticlesAdherence and Effects Derived from FODMAP Diet on Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Real Life Evaluation of a Large Follow-Up Observation. Nutrients. 2020 Mar 27;12(4): Authors: Gravina AG, Dallio M, Romeo M, Di Somma A, Cotticelli G, Loguercio C, Federico A Abstract INTRODUCTION: Irritable bowel syndrome represents one of the most difficult gastroenterological diseases to treat, that usually induces the patients to follow different drug therapies, often not useful in symptom control. In this scenario low FODMAP diet could have positive effects in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, even because this type of diet regimen is characterized by a low gluten amount due to the exclusion of cereals. METHODS: We enrolled 120 patients with irritable bowel syndrome, according to the Rome IV criteria, who were referred to Hepatogastroenterology Division of the University of Campania L. Vanvitelli from June to December 2018. They underwent a low FODMAP diet for six weeks, followed by a gradual weekly reintroduction of every category of food for three months. The patients had a follow-up evaluation for six months after the end of food reintroduction period. We measured abdominal pain with subjective numerical scale from 0 to 10. We evaluated other gastrointestinal symptoms with a questionnaire about symptoms of lower digestive tract, evaluating their frequency and intensity. We also evaluated the impact of irritable bowel syndrome on daily life with neurological bowel dysfunction score. RESULTS: We obtained a good patient-adherence to diet and a statistically significant decrease of abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence, diarrhea, constipation, and neurological bowel dysfunction score (p < 0.001) at the end of the diet. These results remained constant in the follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: We recommend the use of a low FODMAP diet regimen in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in order to control the symptoms and improve the quality of life. PMID: 32230832 [PubMed - in process] View the full article
  8. Last week
  9. For IBS Awareness Month, a free trial offer to help improve IBS symptoms BioSpace CHICAGO, April 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- During April, IBS Awareness Month, biotech company Glycom is offering a free trial offer of Holigos® IBS Restore for people suffering from abdominal pain, bloating, constipation or diarrhea caused by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Patients with IBS will need to reach out to their healthcare professionals to obtain their free product sample. Experience the interactive Multichannel News Release here: https://www.multivu.com/players/English/8704051-glycom-free-trial-of-holigos-ibs-restore-for-ibs-awareness-month/ View the full article
  10. We have partnered with @AARDATweets to host "A National Briefing: CDC on COVID-19 and Autoimmune Disease" on Friday, April 3 at 2 p.m. EDT. Listen to @DrPeacockCDC, @DCharabaty and others provide updates for people with autoimmune conditions.Register at http://ow.ly/WSCg30quxno (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  11. .@US_FDA has requested withdrawal of all ranitidine products (Rx & OTC) from the US market. As part of the ongoing investigation of NDMA presence in ranitidine, they determined that impurity in some ranitidine products increases over time & when stored at higher than room temps. https://twitter.com/FDA_Drug_Info/status/1245368278651830273 (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  12. ACG's President Dr. @MarkPochapin of @nyulangone in #NYC working on behalf of patients and educating a #GIfellow Dr Yan Cui #COVID19 #COVID19GI #Gastroenterology #ACGfamily #GIcommunity #GIfellowship @yycui90 https://twitter.com/MarkPochapin/status/1245179540860801024 (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  13. Mild COVID-19 Often Appears With Only Gastro Symptoms: Study HealthDay WEDNESDAY, April 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- When most people think of COVID-19, they imagine symptoms such as a dry cough and high fever. But new research out of China shows that a minority of cases appear with gastrointestinal symptoms only. In about one-quarter of patients in the new study, diarrhea and other digestive symptoms were the only symptoms seen in mild COVID-19 cases, and those patients sought medical care later than those with respiratory symptoms. "Failure to recognize these patients early and often may lead to unwitting spread of the disease among outpatients with mild illness, who remain undiagnosed and unaware of their potential to infect others," said a team from Union Hospital and Tongji Medical College in Wuhan, China, the original epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic. View the full article
  14. Stacey Missmer, ScD, on the Association Between Endometriosis and IBS in Adolescents MedPage Today Research has shown that there is an association between endometriosis and the risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults. However, adolescents and young women have been underrepresented in these studies and the extent to which there is an association between endometriosis and IBS in this population is unclear. In Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stacey Missmer, ScD, scientific director at the Boston Center for Endometriosis, and Amy DiVasta, MD, MMSc, of the division of adolescent/young adult medicine at Boston Children's Hospital, and colleagues, investigated the association between endometriosis and IBS in adolescents, and whether other factors, such as pain disorders or mood disturbances, influence that association. View the full article
  15. Josh207

    No relief

    I’ve had a flare up lasting for about 11 days now. The only thing that’s really effecting me is cramping and intense bloating. No issues with constipation or diarrhea currently. It seems it is worse after eating and sometimes even from just drinking water. But for the most part just intense bloating throughout the day. I’ve never had a flare up or sorts last this long and was wondering if anyone else has had a similar situation and what they did.
  16. VIDEO with William Chey, MD @umfoodoc, from @umichmedicine , @AmCollegeGastro trustee, on the impact of #COVID19 on use of #telehealth https://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/practice-management/news/online/%7Bd153982a-4380-4693-90bf-8890e371b1e5%7D/video-impact-of-covid-19-on-use-of-telehealth?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=sociallinks (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  17. Important #AmJGastro #COVID19 science via @TODAYshow @BrennanSpiegel #Gastroenterology "Diarrhea, nausea or vomiting may be first signal of coronavirus in some patients" https://www.today.com/health/diarrhea-nausea-or-vomiting-may-be-first-coronavirus-symptoms-some-t177179 via @TODAYshow (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  18. ACG Trustee Dr. Wm Chey @umfoodoc via @HealioGastro on #telehealth #COVID19 #COVID19GI "VIDEO: Impact of COVID-19 on use of telehealth" https://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/practice-management/news/online/%7Bd153982a-4380-4693-90bf-8890e371b1e5%7D/video-impact-of-covid-19-on-use-of-telehealth?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=sociallinks (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  19. News from #AmJGastro on #COVID19GI via @HealioGastro @BrennanSpiegel, "Patients with #COVID19 GI symptoms experience delayed diagnosis, viral clearance" https://www.healio.com/gastroenterology/infection/news/online/%7Bf33cb323-6ed6-43e2-a5aa-e10aeaecb863%7D/patients-with-covid-19-gi-symptoms-experience-delayed-diagnosis-viral-clearance?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=sociallinks (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
  20. Digestive Symptoms Present in Mild COVID-19 Disease, Sometimes Without Fever Newswise Newswise — March 31, 2020 -- A new study published in pre-print on March 30, 2020 by The American Journal of Gastroenterology is the first analysis of gastrointestinal symptoms reported by COVID-19 patients with mild disease rather than those with moderate or critical illness and finds a unique sub-group with low severity disease marked by presence of digestive symptoms, most notably diarrhea.The authors from Union Hospital and Tongji Medical College in Wuhan, China report that among some of the patients included in the study, these digestive symptoms, particularly diarrhea, were the presentation of COVID-19, and were only later, or never, present with respiratory symptoms or fever. View the full article
  21. How to Prevent Spreading of GI Viruses in the Age of COVID-19 Advice from Digestive Disease Experts from the American College of Gastroenterology The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) wants to remind everyone that with increasing scientific data suggesting the presence of the coronavirus (COVID-19) in stool (feces), it is more important than ever for people with diarrhea – especially if accompanied by fever – to be extremely careful. Digestive health experts from the ACG urge you to take common sense steps to prevent spreading viruses when using the bathroom. These important protections apply to any viruses with GI symptoms, whether COVID-19 infection is present or not. While the data does not yet clearly confirm that COVID-19 can spread through stool, its presence in the stool should lead anyone with new symptoms of diarrhea and fever, particularly those with known or suspected contact with COVID-19, to take steps to isolate themselves and call their doctor or local health department. Common Sense Steps to Prevent Spreading Any GI Virus Patients with diarrhea symptoms and fever should take these safe, smart, everyday steps that anyone should take whenever they are suffering from any form of diarrhea that is caused by an underlying infection, COVID or otherwise: take special care to wipe down toilets after use, use a different roll of toilet paper than those with whom you share a bathroom, and wipe the toilet handle and doorknobs. More Information on COVID-19 for GI Patients The American College of Gastroenterology and its more than 14,000 physicians are committed to the digestive and liver health of patients everywhere. COVID-19 Pandemic: How Will This Affect Your Care and What to Ask Your Gastrointestinal (GI) Doctor General Information for GI Patients in a handout by the ACG Patient Care Committee bit.ly/ACG-COVID19-GI-Patients Inflammatory Bowel Disease and COVID-19 Patient Information ACG Experts on Inflammatory Bowel Disease offer specific guidance in a handout for patients with IBD during the COVID-19 Pandemic bit.ly/ACG-COVID19-IBD-Patient https://webfiles.gi.org/links/patients/ACG_Patient_Guidance_to_Prevent_GI_Virus_Spread_During_COVID-19_FINAL_03272020.pdf
  22. Patients with COVID-19 GI symptoms experience delayed diagnosis, viral clearance Healio Patients who develop new-onset digestive symptoms, like diarrhea, after a possible exposure to COVID-19 should be suspected for the illness, according to research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. In the study, Xiaohua Hou, MD, PhD, of the division of gastroenterology at Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology in Wuhan, China, and colleagues wrote that these patients should be suspected for COVID-19 even without common respiratory symptoms, such as cough, shortness of breath, sore throat or fever. “This study is vital because it represents the 80% or more of patients who do not have severe or critical disease,” Brennan M.R. Spiegel, MD, MSHS, FACG,director of health research at Cedars Sinai, said in a press release issued by the American College of Gastroenterology. “This is about the more common scenario of people in the community struggling to figure out if they might have COVID-19 because of new-onset diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting.” View the full article
  23. Please join ModifyHealth for a FREE global webinar: Managing IBS/Low-FODMAP In The Midst of COVID-19Featuring international leading IBS/Low FODMAP experts Prof. Peter Gibson (Monash University AU) and Patsy Catsos, MS, RDN, LD Presented by Monash University & ModifyHealth Wednesday, April 1, 2020 @ 7pm EDT This webinar has been prepared for both healthcare providers and patients alike as we discuss the following important topics: 1. Potential Impact on IBS Patients from COVID-19 2. Best Practices for Managing IBS During COVID-19 3. Managing the Low FODMAP Diet During COVID-19 4. Tools and Resources Available There will be an interactive Q&A time at the end of the presentation. Please click here to register: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/6215853298283/WN_6ehFiekCTMyCKvER5B3qRQ
  24. OrphoMed Pauses Recruitment for Phase 2 Adaptive Design Study of ORP-101 for Treatment of IBS-D BioSpace SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- OrphoMed Inc, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing first-in-class dimer therapeutics, has paused new patient recruitment for its Phase 2 trial of ORP-101 for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Frank J. Steinberg, D.O., Head of Medical Oversight and founding Chief Medical Officer at OrphoMed, notified study sites through the contract research organization PPD® that screening should be temporarily stopped as of the end of business Friday, March 27, 2020. View the full article
  25. OrphoMed Pauses Recruitment for Phase 2 Adaptive Design Study of ORP-101 for Treatment of IBS-D Business Wire SAN FRANCISCO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--OrphoMed, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing first-in-class dimer therapeutics, has paused new patient recruitment for its Phase 2 trial of ORP-101 for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Frank J. Steinberg, D.O., Head of Medical Oversight and founding Chief Medical Officer at OrphoMed, notified study sites through the contract research organization PPD® that screening should be temporarily stopped as of the end of business Friday, March 27, 2020. “Our goal is to ensure that patient safety, as well as the safety of PPD® and site personnel, is not jeopardized,” Dr. Steinberg stated. “We hope that current ‘shelter in place’ practices in much of the country will decrease the spread of the coronavirus and will lead to a much improved situation and the resumption of study enrollment. In the meantime, we will work diligently to continue the study as planned for all patients currently enrolled to ensure their safety and the integrity of study data.” View the full article
  26. Unraveling gut-to-brain communication paves way for targeted treatments News-Medical.Net Scientists at Flinders University have, for the first time, identified a specific type of sensory nerve ending in the gut and how these may 'talk' to the spinal cord, communicating pain or discomfort to the brain. This discovery is set to inform the development of new medications to treat problems associated with gut-to-brain communication, paving the way for targeted treatments to mitigate related dysfunction. While our understanding of the gut's neurosensory abilities has grown rapidly in recent years, two of the great mysteries have been where and how the different types of sensory nerve endings in the gut lie, and how they are activated. View the full article
  27. Thanks @PsyLupe for this video!! Great resource for all of us. #TuesdayNightIBS https://twitter.com/PsyLupe/status/1244682540323127298 (Feed generated with FetchRSS) View the full article
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