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  1. Today
  2. Why IBS and poop are suddenly so trendy CNET The signs of IBS used to be too taboo to even mention, but now they're all over TikTok. Here's what's behind the cultural pooping shift and why it matters. Some people act as if they don't have bowel movements, while others make TikToks about them. For something that was often left behind closed (bathroom) doors, bowel movements and digestive problems seem to be a growing topic of common conversation in line with the public's growing interest and knowledge of digestive health, including the gut microbiome. View the full article
  3. Vitamin D supplements ineffective treatment for painful IBS symptoms Medical Xpress Vitamin D supplements are not an effective treatment for easing painful symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), a new study from the University of Sheffield reveals. Scientists from the University's Department of Oncology and Metabolism—in conjunction with health supplement company, BetterYou—carried out trials on participants who suffer with the chronic condition of the digestive system to assess whether vitamin D reduced the severity of their symptoms, and whether it could improve their quality of life. View the full article
  4. Yesterday
  5. Dig Dis Sci. 2021 Jul 29. doi: 10.1007/s10620-021-07175-z. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT PURPOSE: Abdominal pain is a cardinal sign of functional bowel disorders (FBD), in favor of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, the determinants of abdominal pain severity (APS) are unknown. The present study aimed to search the relationships between APS and demographic, psychological, and clinical parameters in tertiary care FBD outpatients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, we included 2043 new outpatients with FBD or functional abdominal pain. They fulfilled the Rome III questionnaire, psychological evaluation, and four 10-points Likert scale for the perceived severity of constipation, diarrhea, bloating, and abdominal pain. Linear regression was performed for each phenotype to model the severity of abdominal pain with demographic, psychological parameters, and symptoms severity. RESULTS: APS was positively associated with bloating severity in all phenotypes, but APS was also associated with other variables according to gender and phenotype. APS was negatively associated with age and positively with depression, constipation severity, and diarrhea severity in female patients. In male patients, APS was associated with state anxiety, constipation severity, and diarrhea severity. APS severity was associated with bloating severity and transit severity in IBS patients, while in non-IBS patients, APS was only associated with bloating severity. CONCLUSION: Perceived abdominal pain severity is always associated with perceived bloating severity in FBD and FAP patients. PMID:34324087 | DOI:10.1007/s10620-021-07175-z View the full article
  6. Last week
  7. SIBO has other symptoms associated with it and it's not entirely clear if everyone who has SIBO also has IBS. If you were doing research you no doubt stumbled on Dr. Mark Pimentel's work with SIBO at Cedar Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. He is the expert on using rifaximin and other antibiotics to reduce the bacteria in the small gut. I would give the motegrity a chance. If it doesn't help, there are other constipation medications that can be tried. You can also ask for breath testing to see if SIBO is really the issue and then find a doctor that follows Dr. Pimentel's protocol.
  8. This is so helpful! I'm glad to hear that I may not have to do the colonoscopy, that scares me!!!! Yes, I really hope to cook yummy food and treats again once I get a diagnosis of what this is, and feel more confident in my situation. That's good to know that things are over and I'm reduced to frozen dinners and bland items.
  9. Thank you. He took the 2 milligram motegrity last night. Hopefully it will work soon. As I’m sure you are aware, it makes for a near impossible life. Haven’t stopped researching for days and I stumbled upon it. Although, there is a test for SIBO. We have also been told that he may have to also take miralax. The two drugs I read about were erythromycin and rifaximin.
  10. Global Prevalence of Functional Constipation According to the Rome Criteria Medical Bag Even as the same definitions are applied and similar methodologies used, the prevalence of functional constipation varies widely among countries, from less than 1% to more than 30%, according to a study published in The Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology. While constipation is a common bowel disorder, cross-sectional surveys have revealed variability in its prevalence. To estimate the global prevalence of functional constipation, researchers performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies by searching MEDLINE, Embase, and Embase Classic databases from January 1, 1990 to December 31, 2020. They identified studies that used comparable methodologies and all iterations of the Rome criteria. Of the 8174 citations evaluated, 45 studies were deemed eligible, representing a total of 80 separate populations and consisting of 275,260 participants. View the full article
  11. I'm actually not aware of any antibiotics being used for constipation. Erythromycin is sometimes used to empty out the contents of the stomach and propel things along the small gut for people who suffer from gastroparesis. There is some research about small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) that uses antibiotics to treat patients. Motegrity is a good drug for constipation. It works by increasing the levels of serotonin in the gut thereby increasing movement.
  12. My son is 42. Never had a problem until 3 months ago. It’s been awful. He eats really healthy and drinks lots of water. Did the micro lax, dulcolax, psyllium, senna, etc. Went to Dr. yesterday and started on motegrity. However, I’m thinking that because this came out of the blue, that perhaps there is a slight infection in his small intestine and I’m thinking that it might be worth a try. I have read that erythromycin and rica I’m in are often prescribed. Any thoughts on this?
  13. Am J Gastroenterol. 2021 Jul 28. doi: 10.14309/ajg.0000000000001395. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Peppermint oil is often used to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); however, the overall quality of previous studies is low, and findings have been heterogeneous. This study aimed to compare the effects of peppermint oil vs placebo in relieving IBS symptoms. METHODS: In a 6-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial at a single academic center in the United States, individuals diagnosed with IBS (Rome IV criteria), with moderate to severe symptoms based on the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS score ≥175), were randomized to enteric-coated peppermint oil 180 mg 3 times daily vs placebo in a 1:2 ratio. The primary outcome was mean change in IBS-SSS scores from baseline to 6-week endpoint. RESULTS: A modified intent-to-treat analysis revealed that there were substantial mean improvements from baseline to 6-week endpoint in the main outcome measure (IBS-SSS) for both peppermint oil (90.8, SD = 75.3) and placebo (100.3, SD = 99.6). Although the peppermint oil group reported numerically lower improvement than the placebo group, the effect size was small (d = -0.11), and the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.97). Similarly, both groups reported substantial improvements on the secondary endpoints; but again, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups on any of the secondary measures. Sensitivity analyses using multiple imputation to replace missing data produced similar results and revealed no significant differences between peppermint oil and placebo on any outcome measure. DISCUSSION: Peppermint oil and placebo both showed clinically meaningful improvement in IBS symptoms. However, there were no significant differences between the groups. Further large, rigorous trials are needed to evaluate the role of peppermint oil for the treatment of IBS. PMID:34319275 | DOI:10.14309/ajg.0000000000001395 View the full article
  14. Hi Jeffrey, thank you for the reply. A lot of what you're saying makes sense. I can PM you my location if that's alright.
  15. Yes, definitely, much of the time whenever I have tea with caffeine. I find that weaker tea has less of an effect so I tend to only steep my tea for 30 seconds when I'm having caffeine. Some people actually seem to use the fact that caffeinated coffee will give them a bowel movement that they use that as their morning routine. Since IBS tends to wax and wane, I'm hopeful that you will be able to get back to coffee at some point. Good luck with your colonoscopy!
  16. elizabethmaslanka

    Success story!!

    PS: Also I can now eat ANY food I want and it is WONDERFUL. I will never give up gluten, ice-cream, or a good cocktail ever again!!
  17. elizabethmaslanka

    food for thought: my journey towards healing

    PS: Also I can now eat ANY food I want and it is WONDERFUL. I will never give up gluten, ice-cream, or a good cocktail ever again!!
  18. Hello all! I want to share my story and perhaps give some hope. I have been well for several years now but have been hesitant to post anything in fear I might jinx it haha; however I think now is the time to share my healing journey. I was diagnosed with IBS by a GI doctor and struggled with it for 7 years. I had both IBS-C and IBS-D. My symptoms started when I was 17 and worsened over the years. It got so bad that there were only about 20 foods that I could eat and not strongly react to. I tried everything to heal. I tried a host of Drs, meds, supplements, diets, chiropractic's, naturopathies, etc. Nothing seemed to help. I was at my lowest point 3 years ago and felt so anxious, depressed, alone, scared, and isolated. It was then that I learned about the connection between the mind and body and started to heal. I read a book by Dr John Sarno called the divided mind and another one by Dr Howard Schubiner called unlearn your pain (There are a host of other books on the same topic but those are the two I found most helpful). I began to realize that stress and suppressed emotions can cause a physical symptom such as diarrhea or constipation. I learned that I was focusing so much on my body and symptoms and ignoring the emotional hurt that I felt for so many years. I was unlearning what I was taught by my family and so many healthcare professionals saying there was something wrong with my body. I learned that suppressing my emotions and hyper focusing on my symptoms were the real disease. I experienced true healing that was heartbreaking, raw, and freeing. I have been a registered nurse for the past 5 years and work in primary care and can say that IBS is not caused from your GI tract but from your brain. This has been verified for me both from my observations with patients, chronic pain seminars that I've attended through my work, and my own personal experience. I am completely cured from IBS for the past 2 years and will occasionally get a flare up when under a lot of stress. When I do have a flare I do not get upset because I have learned that 100% of all humans will get a physical symptom when stressed whether its upset stomach, heart palpitations, back pain, blushing, hives etc. I know that IBS and chronic pain can make you feel so alone and scared. I know the pain and isolation because I have been there, but there is hope for healing. Whoever is reading this know that you deserve to live a joyful life and to be free of chronic pain. Healing may be painful when digging up emotional suffering, but the truth will ultimately set you free. I do not want to preach that I know all the answers because my healing was only made possible by the fruits of caring doctors, psychologists, and other people who have shared their success stories. Now it is time that I also will humbly share my story of healing in hopes that even one person may find it helpful, which would make the many years of suffering have some meaning. Thank you for those of you who read my long post to the end and God bless!
  19. I had a bad IBS flare starting about 6 weeks ago mostly with IBS-D, it seemed to be slowly getting better. Well, I tried coffee for first time in 6 weeks, and within 30 minutes it gave me diarrhea. Anyone experience this, as very frustrating as I use to drink coffee in past with no major issues like that. I am hoping eventually can get back to some coffee in future. My doctor thinks it is a bad flare from stress, and I do have a colonoscopy in a couple weeks with a annual screening, hopefully put me at ease some.
  20. elizabethmaslanka

    Success story!!

    Hello all! I want to share my story and perhaps give some hope. I have been well for several years now but have been hesitant to post anything in fear I might jinx it haha; however I think now is the time to share my healing journey. I was diagnosed with IBS by a GI doctor and struggled with it for 7 years. I had both IBS-C and IBS-D. My symptoms started when I was 17 and worsened over the years. It got so bad that there were only about 20 foods that I could eat and not strongly react to. I tried everything to heal. I tried a host of Drs, meds, supplements, diets, chiropractic's, naturopathies, etc. Nothing seemed to help. I was at my lowest point 3 years ago and felt so anxious, depressed, alone, scared, and isolated. It was then that I learned about the connection between the mind and body and started to heal. I read a book by Dr John Sarno called the divided mind and another one by Dr Howard Schubiner called unlearn your pain (There are a host of other books on the same topic but those are the two I found most helpful). I began to realize that stress and suppressed emotions can cause a physical symptom such as diarrhea or constipation. I learned that I was focusing so much on my body and symptoms and ignoring the emotional hurt that I felt for so many years. I was unlearning what I was taught by my family and so many healthcare professionals saying there was something wrong with my body. I learned that suppressing my emotions and hyper focusing on my symptoms were the real disease. I experienced true healing that was heartbreaking, raw, and freeing. I have been a registered nurse for the past 5 years and work in primary care and can say that IBS is not caused from your GI tract but from your brain. This has been verified for me both from my observations with patients, chronic pain seminars that I've attended through my work, and my own personal experience. I am completely cured from IBS for the past 2 years and will occasionally get a flare up when under a lot of stress. When I do have a flare I do not get upset because I have learned that 100% of all humans will get a physical symptom when stressed whether its upset stomach, heart palpitations, back pain, blushing, hives etc. I know that IBS and chronic pain can make you feel so alone and scared. I know the pain and isolation because I have been there, but there is hope for healing. Whoever is reading this know that you deserve to live a joyful life and to be free of chronic pain. Healing may be painful when digging up emotional suffering, but the truth will ultimately set you free. I do not want to preach that I know all the answers because my healing was only made possible by the fruits of caring doctors, psychologists, and other people who have shared their success stories. Now it is time that I also will humbly share my story of healing in hopes that even one person may find it helpful, which would make the many years of suffering have some meaning. Thank you for those of you who read my long post to the end and God bless!
  21. Sensory adaptation training improves persistent symptoms in IBS-C Healio Compared with escitalopram, sensory adaptation training significantly improved hypersensitivity and bowel symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome with constipation, according to a study published in Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology. “The barostat [G&J Electronics] is not widely used clinically, similar to other motility tools, but is commercially available, has been used in innumerable studies, and with some training can be adapted for sensori-behavioral therapy,” Satish S.C. Rao, MD, PhD, FRCP, from the division of neurogastroenterology/motility at Augusta University, and colleagues wrote. “Hence, [sensory adaptation training (SAT)] could be a viable treatment option for selected patients with refractory IBS symptoms, but further validation is needed including comparison with sham therapy, and newer visceral analgesics, and assessment of durability of response.” View the full article
  22. Some days or even weeks I suffer from this. I do wonder about the role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) - plays in this. It seems to be the only thing that might change for me even though I haven't really changed my diet. There are treatment options for SIBO. Have you ever investigated this with your doctor as a cause for your constant flatulence?
  23. Jeffrey Roberts

    Sad and feeling defeated

    The proper way to diagnosis someone with IBS is to listen carefully to their medical/symptom history and follow the Rome Criteria looking for any red flag symptoms. In 90% of cases, a colonoscopy is not necessary so don't worry about that just yet. If this is IBS, know that there are treatment options, while not perfect, will hopefully get you back to enjoying cooking again. My daughter has IBS and enjoys cooking. It also helps with her anxiety about eating and dealing with symptoms.
  24. Thanks so much Jeff! I will get to my family doctor asap. How do they diagnose you? Just curious...I'm so scared to have a colonoscopy, but feel it may be near. I did read that too with the FODMAP diet, I've just been grabbing at straws honestly. Making dinner is absolutely impossible anymore where I usually cook a few crockpot meals a week for my family, but again I get so sick usually with chicken and noodles things like that. Now I just don't have the energy to find something because I enjoy cooking, but if I can't eat it then that's torture. I'm glad to hear there are meds. Ok, I will do the obvious and get to my doctor. Thank you so much!! Stay tuned:)
  25. Dear wandering_risa, I'm sorry I missed reading this when it was posted. Thank you for sharing something that I am sure was difficult to share. It's great that you consulted a nutritionist to try and get to the bottom of this. I've always felt that malabsorption of a food was the cause of smelly gas. Fermenting of foods by your gut is also a factor. I have heard that sugary foods are a feast for your bacteria in your gut and that might also be contributing to your gas. Which city are you located in Canada? I can try and find a doctor that you could try and see.
  26. Jeffrey Roberts

    Ibs Getting worse with age?

    My IBS changed from IBS-D to IBS-mixed over the years. I have always thought that was just age slowing down my gut. Doctors have said that IBS should get better as you age, but I'm not sure I believe that. At least, that's not what has happened for me.
  27. Doctors say that once a confident diagnosis of IBS is made, that in 90% of cases, that's the diagnosis as things don't progress to anything else. In my case, I did have extremely bad pain for about 1 year with prolonged diarrhea and after begging my doctor to see me and scope me, he discovered that I actually have Crohn's disease and IBS. So, I always tell everyone, that if something is different, talk to a doctor.
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