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  1. I am a generally healthy and active 23 year old who has drawn the conclusion that I am suffering from IBS-C and I don’t know where to begin in terms of managing this/ healing myself. I believe my symptoms are related to stress and anxiety. (Especially as my dentist has recently noticed I am an intense teeth clencher ). I have never dealt with irregular bowel movements before. I first had a bout of terrible constipation and bloating in May of this year. I was terribly stressed and anxious over a final exam in my hardest course that would inevitably determine wether I’d make or break my Straight A streak. I had never felt more terrible. The bloating, the gas, the lack of appetite, the nausea. Though I still managed to pass at least one bowel movement a day I still didn’t feel great. Once the test was over, my grades came in and I walked across that stage excepting my diploma, all was well again. I dealt with mild bloating the months after but nothing Intense that weren’t self resolving very quickly. However, when august rolled around and I found myself under immense stress and anxiety once again my bowels locked up. I am preparing to move abroad to the UK to begin law school and the visa process was severely stressing me out. I had the same symptoms I did last may. Within a little over a week my ailments dissipated. And here I am again….almost exactly a month later. A week and a half out from making my big move to the UK and im dealing with this constipation, bloating, gas, nausea, and lack of appetite again. I don’t know what to do or where to begin to manage this. I don’t want to feel sick anymore. I have a bowel movement once a day but its never a complete elimination and I can feel as stressful events come up my body stops working. My mom has urged me to join these types of forums and groups just as she’s done to help heal her own gut health and thyroid. I also have a really great boyfriend, who I’m about be living with in the UK, who also deals with IBS, more specifically IBS-D, that he was diagnosed with back in our early teen years. I want to know where to begin in terms of diet and supplements and healing. I know I first and foremost need to manage my stress and anxiety and if anyone has any good tips on how to do this I would greatly appreciate it. I’m 23, I feel far too young to be dealing with the level of stress and anxiety I am enduring. I am crying out into the void of an uncertain world, I’m about to make a huge move across the globe, and I feel under immense pressure to “make it” in my adult life. I WANT TO FEEL GOOD AND HEALTHY AND NORMAL!!! This was a long post and probably more of a ramble than anything useful but I just need to break into a space where maybe I can seek out and find help. What I’m Currently doing to manage this all now: 1. Taking 2 types of magnesium supplements together 2. Peppermint tea 3. Beginning a process of elimination diet.
  2. Do you experience undiagnosed gut issues? Are you engaging with alternative forms of information or treatment, including online forums, independent research or consulting a naturopath? Doctors can find it challenging to treat undiagnosed gut issues. As a result, people may take a more active role in managing their own condition. Researchers from University of Melbourne are interviewing people living with complex, difficult to diagnose gut issues about the creative and experimental ways they manage their symptoms. Please read our website to learn more https://stomachacheproject.com/get-involved/ .
  3. Improving Gut Health – CBS San Francisco CBS San Francisco CBS News Bay Area anchor Elizabeth Cook talks with Cedars Sinai Gastroenterologist Dr. Mark Pimentel about all things IBS, SIBO, gut health and the microbiome.
  4. ** NOTE: This was written more aimed at Mirena-related blogs, but as I think it contributed to my last IBS episode and have read of other women also experiencing GI-related impacts from it, I thought it may help to post for other IBS sufferers as well ** I had the Mirena IUD inserted in March 2017. Soon after, I began to have a full-blown IBS episode (which I'd had one in 2011), so when my hair started thinning and a multitude of other things happened, I blamed the IBS and a preexisting spine injury. However, with regards to my brain - I experienced problems there too, as well as worsening depression. I also developed ovarian cysts, obtaining multiple (costly) ultrasounds to check on their size and never once did any doctor remind me that Mirena causes them – I spent months worried I had cancer or something. Some history: In Jan. 2016 I got a concussion. I had post concussion symptoms for roughly a year (inc. headache, nausea, foggy brain, etc.). These symptoms had essentially gone away (with occasional headaches and some nausea, although that could be related to my IBS). I had the Mirena IUD inserted in March 2017 to address increased cramps and bleeding apparently associated with perimenopause. For several months I was dealing with my IBS flare-up which caused a host of other issues. However, beginning in the fall of 2017, I began to experience more headaches reminiscent of post-concussion headaches, and eventually they became almost daily. I was also experiencing problems with concentration again. I talked to my chiropractor about this (who’s had special training regarding concussions and been more helpful in managing it than any other doctors), and blamed the recurrence on extra computer work and stress. Around Dec/Jan., I noticed my ‘brain fog’ was getting worse, making concentration and communication more difficult. It became hard to switch subjects or respond quickly, as if my brain were sluggish - which was something I dealt with the first year after my concussion, but that had resolved. I started to worry I was doing something to cause my post-concussion to get worse, as the fogginess just kept getting worse. I began taking fish oil in January (2018), which helped a lot with headaches, but the fogginess has continued and even gotten worse. I also found my hair was thinning well beyond my IBS episode, which had come back under control the previous fall (for the most part). I began searching online and found Mirena was tied to hair loss and many other things, including a 'foggy brain.' I began to find more info about the cranial pressure impacts and things are starting to fall into place. I had the IUD removed last week and am hoping things will resolve soon. This has affected my work, sleep, and my social interactions as I've become anxious over communication; when you can't respond right away or form the right words immediately, it's embarrassing and frustrating so you just begin avoiding social situations. I'm self-employed and my work requires public interaction, so this is a big problem! Update: It’s been almost 2 months since I had the IUD removed. Within the first few days, my brain fog started to clear up. Big time! My head was also tingly – hopefully a good sign for hair growth. My body is now trying to readjust itself; my cycle is still out of whack but I have had a couple of periods. My hormones are all over the place and I noticed starting about 2 weeks ago (so about 5-6 weeks after the IUD was removed), my depression got much worse, and I had about a week-long IBS flareup; still worse than usual but slightly improved now. I have wondered if I’m currently experiencing the “Mirena Crash”, which I have read can start within weeks or months from removal when your body is temporarily without enough hormones while your natural system is trying to kick back into gear). My hair has continued to thin, but I’m not giving up hope. I have learned more about hair cycles, and looking back, I see that my hair started to fall out more after I had the IUD inserted (but I blamed my IBS flare-up as I can’t get enough nutrition when it happens so my hair thins). Then about 8 months after insertion, my hair almost stopped falling out – just a few strands when I brushed. However what was left kept thinning, to where each strand is smaller and my hair is thin and brittle (which note: it’s down to my lower back and it makes me sick at the idea I may have to cut it off if this doesn’t improve). I’ve started taking Viviscal and using Wild Hair Growth oil with fingers crossed. As my hair started to fall out again, it appears to be about the “normal” amount that sheds each day. There are small bulbs (aka “clubs”) on the ends of what is falling out, which according to what I’ve read, may be “good” news – when our hair follicles start working again, new hair growth will push out old hair. In the meantime, my scalp is showing more, but I’m hoping things are moving in the right direction. I read on other posts that it can get worse before it gets better. Looking back, I realize I was happier with life and more comfortable with myself before I got the IUD (and depression was better controlled). I had started dating (because I had been feeling better over the previous couple of years…hmm, while I was not on any birth control…) and met someone right around the time I had it inserted. He was a good guy who was very understanding about my 2-month long heavy period and major cramping after insertion, as well as when my IBS flare-up came on (which I now suspect the IUD contributed to bringing it on). However, my depression got worse, mood swings galore, plus the brain fog started and along with some other ‘confidence’ issues I think most people with chronic medical conditions have, I was not feeling like the greatest catch, so I stayed in that relationship even though it became clear he wasn’t the one. Looking back, it was like another woman was in that relationship (which lasted for about 8 months). I had given up a lot of who I was and accepted far too much of who he was simply because someone seemed to like me despite all of my medical crap. I also remember questioning how I felt because I just didn’t seem excited enough about him, but yet I stayed in the relationship (I started therapy right around the time we broke up, as I’d been realizing I needed to figure out stress management along with why I’d become a different person with low self esteem). So, I’m posting this because other posts have been so helpful to me with regards to figuring this all out, and realizing I’m not alone. I know that the Mirena IUD seems to work for a lot of women, but Bayer and our doctors need to warn us about the side effects, and because a lot of us don’t realize some of these medical problems are tied to the Mirena, they should check in with Mirena users periodically. Maybe a survey every three months to ask us about symptoms; at least that might help women clue in when things are going bad and realize it could be the Mirena. Also, patients who have had concussions should be warned, just as patients with depression/mental health issues and sensitivity to past hormones should be warned (I had told my doctors that the Depo shot years ago had really messed me up…yet I learned too late that Mirena is basically providing the same synthetic hormone) – I even asked about it specifically and was told it was such a “low dose” and side effects were minimal. BS!). I have read that Bayer previously got in trouble for not clearly disclosing all of the side effects, and that they are revealed more in Canada than in US pamphlets (I checked recently and it does appear Canada’s version provides a bit more honesty). But doctors need to take this seriously too. I guess I needed to do more research before I had the IUD inserted, but I trusted the doctor that said it would be fine and at most, warned me about things like the IUD moving, but not the other stuff (and I admit I was perhaps overly anxious for help with reducing cramps). I should know better, as I’ve had to learn how to manage my chronic medical conditions mostly on my own. Oh, and yes, my sex drive slowly dwindled over the first six months after insertion and pretty much died a quiet death by fall. It’s returned in ‘spurts’ since removal. Sorry for the long post, but I hope it helps other women avoid what I have been going through, or even recognize what may be happening sooner - before it gets this bad. And I was astonished at how few results came up when I searched for “Mirena” and “concussion”, even though their information does ‘admit’ to causing increased intracranial pressure (again, why wouldn’t a doctor warn a patient with post-concussion issues?!) I’ve also seen some information suggesting the device, which apparently contains silicone, may be causing silicone poisoning as a lot of the symptoms are the same. Whether it’s that and/or due to hormonal impacts and cranial pressure, I have no idea, but figure it’s worth mentioning. I’ll try to post an update in a few months – fingers crossed things are much better!
  5. Taking a closer look at a couple options for stress management that may sound familiar but that you may not know much about. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Hypnotherapy More info on the blog!
  6. Ah, it’s that time again, friends. Time for New Year’s Resolutions. This year especially, we may not have the mental space to think about improving ourselves next year (and that’s okay!). We don’t even know if our lives will regain some semblance of “normal” next year. My vote is that we don’t add unnecessary pressure to our lives, but instead we take this new beginning as an opportunity to better care for ourselves. Learn to listen to your body and mind. If you’re looking to improve your IBS symptoms in 2021, consider these low pressure, high impact options. Take Your Needs Seriously If you know that something triggers you, you have the power to turn it down. Even if you feel it would be rude to decline something you’re offered, remind yourself that it isn’t. I can’t count the number of times I’ve eaten just a bit of something I shouldn’t have or cleared my plate knowing I would feel sick afterward. It has taken me so much practice to learn that I can say no. If you’re comfortable, share a bit about why you are declining a food or only serving yourself a child-sized portion at dinner. Share Your Truth Find someone who understands you. Maybe it’s a fellow IBS sufferer or an online forum. Maybe it’s a close friend who doesn’t have a similar experience, but who is willing to listen and learn. Just establishing the freedom to share when you have a flare up with someone you know won’t judge you can be extremely liberating. Even those who aren’t afflicted have likely experienced some level of gut dysfunction in their lives and would be delighted to be there for you when you need some support. The more we normalize our experiences the better things get for all of us. Start with just one person. Acknowledge Anxiety Learn to listen to your body’s signals. When you start feeling that tightness in your chest or when that rumbling starts in your tummy, take a moment to breathe. Allow yourself to say, “I’m not okay.” Write it down in a journal, tell a friend, say it aloud to your dog or whisper your thoughts to a plant. Whatever it takes to release the pressure you’re feeling will be tremendously helpful. In time, this will become second nature and you’ll find that freeing your mind of burdens is the first step to freeing your body too. Be Kind to Yourself Allow yourself to indulge in the foods and drinks and activities that bring you joy. Eat pancakes for dinner, have the occasional glass of wine, skip the run and dance in your kitchen for 20 minutes instead. Forgive yourself for overindulging when you inevitably do and learn from your experiences about moderation and your body’s needs. No one is perfect all the time. - - - - - For most of us, 2020 has been a rollercoaster. Whether you’re working from home and helping your child in the virtual classroom or picking up groceries for your elderly neighbor or sewing masks for everyone you know, there is no doubt in my mind that you spent time this year caring for someone else. And while that can be extremely fulfilling, it can also be draining when we continue to prioritize everyone else before ourselves. The truth is, the better we are to ourselves, the more we can offer to others. Take time in 2021 to be kind to yourself and to take your needs seriously. Share your truth with those you love and ask for their support on your journey. Acknowledge your fears, worries, and anxieties, but don’t let them rule your mind or your gut. Recognize that you deserve to be a top priority in your life and make choices that reflect how much you care about yourself. - - - - - Happy New Year to all. May 2021 bring you happiness, health, and love. Read more about my experience with IBS at https://gut-vibes.com/
  7. I've had so many ups and downs since (and even before) finding out I have IBS. Mostly, I would say that I have learned so, so much and for that I am grateful and I will always seek new information. Seeing myself through this lens has been eye-opening and it has made so many other things about myself and my experiences make sense. I've also found it helpful and cathartic to write things down. (And by "write down" I mean "type out".) Organizing my thoughts and expressing my feelings has helped me untangle parts of my mind and (thanks to the gut-brain axis) my gut has benefitted right along side it. It started as just a digital journal, but it has grown into a blog about my experiences and the helpful information I've found in my research on this journey. Not only has it helped me tremendously to put my thoughts down, but I know some others have reached out to me about how it has helped them too, which is truly humbling. Even if you're not interested in setting up a blog, I highly recommend writing down your thoughts and feelings somewhere. Maybe you keep a physical journal. Maybe you start up a document on your desktop or a note on your phone. Whatever gives you that feeling of letting it all flow and feeling the relief that washes over you when things start to make sense. Feel free to visit me at https://gut-vibes.com/ ! (Although, don't you worry. I'll still be here too. We've got to stick together after all!)
  8. Hi everyone, I’ve struggled with IBS every since I was a little girl but lately it has gotten worse than ever before. That is why I am so glad to have found this support group. Here is my story... (I know it’s long I’m so sorry I really did try to keep it short). I’m a 19 year old female and I have struggled with IBS-C for as long as I can remember. My mom has even told me that when I was a baby she would constantly take me to the doctors because I would rarely ever have normal or regular bowel movements. Also ever since I can remember, I would always complain to my parents about my stomach hurting and not being able to go to the bathroom. I would have really bad cramps, bloating, nausea, etc. I actually went to the ER twice for this issue (once when I wad 4 and again when I was 6). When I was 6, they did an XR (I’m pretty sure but honestly I can’t remember that well) and basically told me that my stomach was full of stool and it had built up. They gave me some medicine while I was there to clear it all out and then told me to take miralax daily. I vaguely remember taking miralax everyday for the next couple of years until I was about 12 or 13 (at least I think) and I’m pretty sure this helped me decently because I don’t remember complaining as much about my stomach hurting. However, I also think I just “got used to it” and basically toughed it out, but I do remember that I still was only able to go to the bathroom about two times a week (but that was still better than nothing). Once high school started, I’m pretty sure I stopped taking miralax and tried to just use home remedies for my stomach pain and IBS C. I would eat activia and Raisin Bran every morning and this seemed to help for the most part. I was still only going to the bathroom about 2 or maybe sometimes 3 times a week. Again, I think at this point I was “just used to the pain”. I don’t remember the pains being too severe or occurring on a daily basis but I do want to say that during the first two or three years of high school I was staying home or leaving school early about once or sometimes twice a month because of how much my stomach hurt. But for the most part, it was pretty manageable overall. Senior year did get a little worse and I missed more days of school and I eventually did go to the ER again because the pain I had experienced that day at school was unbearable and my mom was tired of me calling her to pick me up so she took me to the ER. They literally told me nothing except for that my blood work showed I was anemic. After this, I talked with my doctor and she told me to try low FODMAP, try yoga and meditation to de-stress and to try miralax again. I did all of these but the FODMAP didn’t really seem to make a difference and neither did miralax even though I did it for about a month or two. I Eventually just went on with my life. At this point, I was about to start college on a full-ride scholarship and the program I was in required two camping trips before our freshman year. I was terrified because the trips were almost a week long each and I was scared I wouldn’t be able to go to the bathroom. However, I made sure to drink a lot of water and take some fiber one bars and luckily I wad able to go at least once or twice during the trips. I thought I had it all under control. I then started living on campus because my scholarship program required it and it was a little hard to adjust to this change but once I was a little more comfortable I was able to go about 2 or 3 times a week. Everything was fine until coronavirus hit and everything changed. I’m convinced this was due to all the change and stress. I started having REALLY BAD IBS-D and if everything was still in person there’s no way I would have been able to survive. My job closed so I wasn’t working and classes went online so I was able to stay home and not worry about having to go to the bathroom with diarrhea somewhere else. However, the rare times I would be out, I would have to go home instantly because my stomach hurt and I could just feel the diarrhea coming. It would happen every morning and the Begin to calm down through out the day or it would also happen right after eating. I cried about this all the time because I literally could not go anywhere or do anything without these bouts of diarrhea affecting my day to day life. Occasionally, I would be able to have a good stool but then afterwards I’d be constipated for about a couple days and then immediately followed by diarrhea daily multiply times a day. This cycle continued. I took pepto bismol every time I was leaving my house to ensure I wouldn’t have diarrhea (I know this is probably so bad). Eventually in June/early July I tried “Digestive Advantage Intensive Bowel Support Capsules“. I took these for about a month but it literally made no difference what so ever. After that, in mid July, I tried Metamucil. Immediately this made everything so much better. I started having good normal stools once every morning and I didn’t have cramps, bloating, nausea etc. I even went on another camping trip for about 5 days and took this while being there and it worked perfect. I still take this to this day. However, I did notice that during the first two months there were about 2 days out of the month where I would have a little diarrhea. I took pepto bismol though and it was usually fine. But ever since September, it has just gotten worse. I will have good normal stools for a day or two, followed by IBS C, followed by IBS D and then that cycle just continues. I have talked to my doctor again and she referred me to a gastroenterologist so I’m just waiting for that appointment in the next two weeks. I just want to get some feedback on best methods or medicines to take for IBS D mostly because I feel like I can pretty much manage the constipations but it’s just the diarrhea that interferes with my day to day life and causes me extreme stress, anxiety, and depression. I’ve also been working and going to school again since august and classes are still online so that’s not an issue but this problem DEFINITELY interferes with work and other social activities outside of my home or dorm. The minute I go anywhere I just worry “what If I have diarrhea” and it’s gotten to the point where I just cry every morning I wake up with diarrhea because I feel so hopeless and like nothing will ever control this. I really thought Metamucil would do the trick because of how much it helped the first month or two but it rarely seems to help anymore. If you have any recommendations for home remedies or medicines or specific food please let me know thank you so much. (I also drink chamomile tea every night which I heard can help and also it helps me sleep).
  9. My GI doctor suggested I take tiny doses of something like Prozac to help with my "sensitive stomach" since everything I eat hurts me and I've ruled out all other possible causes. This seems like my only answer for now although I'm not crazy about the idea, even if it is a tiny dose. Does anyone have experience with this?
  10. Hi all, Feeling at a loss right now, since Tuesday I've had this pain in my upper right abdomen that comes and goes. It's just above my belly button on the right side and started as a sharp stabbing pain that lasted for around 10 seconds and it went. The pain yesterday then changed to a cramp still on and off and I was worried. The past 2 days I've been to a GP, A&E and also paid for a private abdominal scan which took 45 mins only for all 3 of them to tell me they can't find anything. I suffer with health anxiety also so this is horrible! I haven't really felt hungry at all and have never really noticed pain like this with my IBS. The area also hurts if I push on it and feels a bit tender. I never really get pain on my right side with IBS My question is if anyone else gets this pain?
  11. Hi everyone, I commiserate with fellow sufferers of this disease. I've been diagnosed with the ibs about two years ago, been coping with it ever since. I stumbled upon this forum and felt it could be of help to me and also I could be of help to others, so I just joined the group.
  12. Last summer I was nearly at my wit’s end with my gut problems. I couldn’t wear anything without looking 6 months pregnant. I felt like garbage all the time. I didn’t have my diagnosis yet, so I was blindly trying anything I could to sort out my symptoms on my own (do not recommend) because I was too embarrassed to make an appointment with my doctor (if this is you, don’t be embarrassed… Make the call!). Every few days I would weigh myself because I was convinced that I’d gained a few pounds and it wasn’t just bloating. (Of course that wouldn’t have explained all my other symptoms, but I was desperate for something—anything—to make sense.) And then it hit me: alcohol. Flashback to the year I lived in Spain. I worked part time and had 3 day weekends. I was 21, fresh out of college, and down to party nearly every weekend. Some nights I wouldn’t drink. I’d stay out late and go dancing, sure, but I wouldn’t always drink. The nights I did drink though, I would have a guaranteed bowel movement the next morning. It was usually urgent, accompanied by severe and painful cramps, and anywhere from a 5-7 on the old Bristol Stool Chart. I thought this was just a normal reaction to drinking because it always happened to me. (Funny what we tell ourselves is normal, huh?) This flashback gave me an idea: maybe I can hack my gut and guarantee a poo every morning if I drink every night. I wasn’t planning to get wasted, just to have a glass of my favorite red after dinner. What could go wrong? For a while it did seem to help. I would have not the most ideal poo the next day, but at least I wasn’t always constipated. After about a week of thinking I had pulled the ultimate con on my gut, things started to go downhill. I realized I was just trading constipation and bloating for diarrhea (and still bloating—not a single summer dress was worn that season). I began to question my gut hack. So why did this seem like a genius scheme (at first) and what happens in your gut when you drink alcohol? Here’s a quick breakdown. Alcohol is naturally an irritant and as we all know from middle school health class, alcohol can have some pretty negative effects on the body, especially if consumed in excess either chronically or acutely. (I won’t go into all that here, because this is about alcohol and IBS, not just alcohol in general.) Alcohol is a stimulant, so it can increase motility (the speed at which your GI tract moves food through your digestive system). This is why it can cause cramping, urgent bowel movements, and diarrhea as your intestines are suddenly moving things through faster than normal. (It was this key feature that I thought I could use to my advantage. Alcohol—1, Me—0) Alcohol is a diuretic which means it makes you urinate more frequently and can lead to dehydration. (Hello, hangover!) In case you didn’t know, staying properly hydrated is not only good for all your inner bits, but it is especially good for your gut to keep things moving properly. Alcohol causes inflammation in the gut and could exacerbate or directly affect many GI disorders if consumed excessively over time, although there is still much to learn about the relationship between alcohol and IBS. It wasn’t completely crazy to think I might be able to manipulate my body to get a desired outcome, but ultimately it was destined to fail because I wasn’t addressing the actual problem. Take it from me: Your gut cannot be outsmarted.
  13. Not strictly IBS but a few patients with collagenous colitis (cc) are misdiagnosed with IBS. Collagenous colitis causes watery diarrhoea which can be confused with IBS-D. I suffered from CC a few years ago and managed to find a way to achieve full remission. I have added a topic to my IBS/Hypothyroidism describing this relatively safe and simple treatment. See http://ibshypo.com/index.php/collagenous-colitis/
  14. Patients With IBD Prone to Irritable Bowel Syndrome Ingrid Hein December 16, 2019 Irritable bowel syndrome can have multiple causes, including inflammatory bowel disease, said William Chey, MD, from Michigan Medicine in Ann Arbor. Patients who only have irritable bowel symptoms almost never have inflammatory bowel disease, but "once in remission for IBD, 30% to 40% of patients show signs of IBS," he reported. "That's a lot of people." "I used to say, jokingly, that the gut is the center of the universe," he added, "but as we go from 2019 to 2020, I increasingly believe that it's true >> https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/922712 Medscape Medical News © 2019
  15. Nowaytolive

    Nowaytolive

    Does anyone else second guess their diagnosis when having a really bad flare?
  16. Gastrointestinal diseases have many overlapping symptoms. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) namely, Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) are two illnesses that effect the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Both can cause abdominal pain and changes in bowel movements; however, they are not the same. While there are many similarities between IBD and IBS, it is important to highlight the differences. The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation has updated their Inflammatory Bowel Disease vs. Irritable Bowel Syndrome brochure. It is an excellent resource for both IBD and IBS patients which highlights these differences. >> https://www.crohnscolitisfoundation.org/sites/default/files/2019-10/ibd-and-IBS-brochure-final.pdf The link has been graciously provided by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation
  17. I am male 25 years old. I’ve been experiencing this sensation on the right side of my abdomen where I feel really gassy. I also get a full feeling. Then that gassy full feeling sometimes goes to my back, but on right side just below the rib cage. I’m not in any pain, but it is annoying. I have also noticed these symptoms are heightened after eating. I have had this going on for just a little over a month, is this something I need to get checked out?
  18. 8 new insights about diet and gut health Three experts share their takeaways from the 2019 James W. Freston Conference: Food at the Intersection of Gut Health and Disease. https://www.gastro.org/news/8-new-insights-about-diet-and-gut-health © 2019 American Gastroenterological Association
  19. I am heading to Chicago Aug 9-10 to attend the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Freston Conference: Food at the Intersection of Gut Health and Disease about the management and treatment of GI sensitivities and disorders through nutrition. There will be topics about IBS, IBD, GERD, Celiac Disease, Gastroparesis and more by leading doctors and Dietitians. I will report back during and after the conference. You can also follow me live on Twitter and Instagram @IBSpatient
  20. The American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society will be hosting their annual ANMS Patient Education Conference to be held on Sunday, August 18, 2019 from 8:00 am-12:00 pm in Chicago. ANMS Patient Education Conference Sunday, August 18 from 8:00 am-12:00 pm Swissôtel Chicago, 323 East Upper Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL Program url: https://motilitysociety.org/page.php?id=547 To register: https://motilitysociety.org/MeetingRegistration.php?code=PDF2019
  21. I have bowel issues, where I have feelings of incomplete bowel movements, often, sometimes alternating from constipation, and diarrhea, mostly constipation. I am straining when I have a bowel movement, I do get a "full" feeling, and dull pain, on the left side of my abdomen. It gets better when I have a bowel movement, but it starts back up once I eat something. I have not lost weight, in fact, im gaining weight, and there is no blood in my stool. I do have clear mucus in my stool often. My main complaints are the feeling of incomplete bowel movements, and the "full" feeling in the left side of my abdomen under the rib cage. Some days are worse than others. I am male, 25, and there is no family history of colon cancer. What is this im concerned thank you!
  22. VSL#3, a probiotic marketed for IBD and IBS, abruptly removed from the Canadian market. http://www.vsl3.ca
  23. Greetings all. I am the author of the IBS Audio Program 100 which after 8 years development was released in 1998. The program has been used in over 45 countries to date. I am now looking for help with a Hindi version of the program. All recordings have been professionally created and now I'm looking for help translating the booklet which accompanies the program. If you are a Hindi reader and writer and you think you might be able to help translate from English to Hindi, please contact me either through this site, or through www.healthyaudio.com In return we can offer you a free copy of the Hindi IBS Audio Program 100 when it is completed. A nominal fee, and the satisfaction of knowing that your help, will go towards helping many IBS sufferers for years to come. Kind regards Michael
  24. Marilyn

    My Diary

    IBS really ruined my whole life, and just like everyone here, I felt
  25. Martin Burridge

    My IBS success story

    My IBS symptoms started in October 2014.I had constipation, burping and excruciating pain under my ribs.I lost 35 pounds (15.8kg) in weight because I basically stopped eating due to the pain. I was off work for 2 months and spent the best part of 8 months in my bedroom. It was May 2015 before I was diagnosed as having IBS. In June 2015 I discovered the FODMAP diet and started by reducing all FODMAP groups. The symptoms reduced 90% within days. In the next few months I discovered my trigger groups were O (inc. wheat, onion, garlic,sweetcorn,brocolli) and M (inc .apples, pears and anything containing glucose fructose syrup). Over the next year I found my tolerance to O and M foods gradually improved but I still had to limit foods that were very high in these FODMAPs. (wheat, onions and garlic in particular), Then I decided to introduce a potent probiotic that did well in independent clinical trials. Its called VSL3 and it is very expensive. To save cost I only took half the dose but mixed it in a relatively cheap probiotic yogurt drink called Actimel. I took the VSL3 first thing in the morning before eating. This is because stomach acid is low at this point which gives the probiotic bacteria the best chance of surviving and reaching the bowel. This seemed to speed up my recovery and I was been able to eat wheat, garlic, onion and foods containing glucose fructose syrup in surprisingly large amounts without any symptoms. There is no instant cure for IBS. I believe it is predominantly a problem of bacterial species mix in the bowel. Changing the species mix in the bowel does not happen overnight. Both the foods we eat and some probiotics can change the mix but there is no magic formula that fits everyone. For me the mix of the FODMAP diet and VSL3 seems to have brought my IBS to an end. The key to defeating IBS is understanding it. I learnt a lot about IBS from my experience so have shared it in a blog to help others who suffer this awful condition. You can view the blog here.
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