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  1. I followed the Crohn's and Colitis Congress #CCCongress over the last several days. It's an annual medically oriented meeting with doctors, researchers, industry and patient advocates focused on Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). While IBD is medically different than IBS, many IBD patients have IBS-like symptoms between flares. Many of the treatment options that IBS patients use are just as relevant to an IBD patient. Many dietary modifications, therapy and often feelings of despair are also similar. The one thing not similar is an understanding that suffering from IBS has just a high impact as IBD on someone's quality of life. I'm working pretty hard to highlight the QOL issues of an IBS sufferer. Since I have both IBS and Crohn's disease, I have a perspective on both. It's sometimes a real challenge to find a doctor that will take IBS as seriously as IBD. I can tell you that they are out there. Find a new doctor, if you can, if your doctor isn't sympathetic to your QOL issues. There is no reason that you have to suffer in silence on your own.
  2. Pain, by definition, is the dominant symptom experienced by patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Three out of 4 people with IBS report continuous or frequent abdominal pain, with pain the primary factor that makes their IBS severe. Importantly, and unlike chronic pain in general, IBS pain is often associated with alterations in bowel movements (diarrhea, constipation, or both) reports Dr. Drossman, a leader in IBS research and treatment. Full article: >> http://drossmancenter.com/understanding-managing-pain-irritable-bowel-syndrome-ibs-tips-insight/ © COPYRIGHT 2017 DROSSMAN CARE
  3. A tweet I made at the recent American College of Gastroenterology conference held this past week in Orlando, FLA resonated with some physicians and researchers. (If you are a Twitter user, follow us @IBSpatient)
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