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Pubmed-Clinical Value of Fecal Calprotectin.

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Health Reporter

Clinical Value of Fecal Calprotectin.

Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci. 2019 May 15;:1-37

Authors: Ricciuto A, Griffiths AM

Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) denotes a group of chronic incurable disorders characterized by relapsing-remitting inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. IBD represents a growing global burden with a prevalence exceeding 0.3% in the Western world and an accelerating incidence in newly industrialized countries. The target for treating IBD has shifted in recent years from symptom control to mucosal healing (MH), which has been shown to be associated with favourable long-term outcomes. The gold standard for ascertaining MH is endoscopic assessment, but endoscopy is limited by its invasive nature, high cost and finite availability. Surrogate biomarkers are therefore of great utility. Calprotectin, a cytosolic protein derived predominantly from neutrophils, is now widely used in this capacity. Calprotectin is found in various bodily fluids at concentrations proportional to the degree of inflammation, including in feces at levels roughly six times higher than in the blood. Fecal calprotectin (FCP) therefore reflects intestinal inflammation. Various assays, including point-of-care and home-based tests, are now available for measuring FCP. FCP is used for screening purposes, to aid in distinguishing inflammatory from non-inflammatory gastrointestinal conditions like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), as well as in the monitoring of known IBD. The aims of this review are to provide an overview of the methods used to measure FCP and to review the evidence supporting the use of FCP in IBD, particularly as it pertains to screening, monitoring and predicting disease relapse.

PMID: 31088326 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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