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Pubmed-Serotonin re-uptake transporter gene polymorphisms are associated with imatinib-induced diarrhoea in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients.

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Serotonin re-uptake transporter gene polymorphisms are associated with imatinib-induced diarrhoea in chronic myeloid leukaemia patients.

Sci Rep. 2020 May 21;10(1):8394

Authors: Davies A, Rodriguez-Vicente AE, Austin G, Loaiza S, Foroni L, Clark RE, Pirmohamed M

Abstract
Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), can cause lower gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity which is manifested as diarrhoea. The mechanisms are not fully understood. The enteroendocrine signalling compound, serotonin (5-HT), is important for regulating peristaltic motion, fluid secretion and visceral hypersensitivity in the GI tract, and has been implicated in diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome. In this study, we have evaluated whether TKI-induced diarrhoea may be related to variation in the serotonin re-uptake transporter (SERT) gene. CML patients with and without diarrhoea on the SPIRIT2 trial (imatinib, n = 319; and dasatinib, n = 297) were genotyped for the promoter 5-HTTLPR, intron 2 VNTR and rs25531 polymorphisms by PCR-based methods. Diarrhoea was more prevalent in imatinib, than in dasatinib treated patients (P = 0.015), which when stratified by gender was seen to be driven by female patients (P = 0.036). Logistic regression analysis revealed that age, and the dominant HTTLPR with the rs25531 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) model, explained the occurrence of diarrhoea in ~10% of imatinib-treated female CML patients. These data suggest SERT polymorphisms influence imatinib-induced diarrhoea but not that of dasatinib.

PMID: 32439979 [PubMed - in process]

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