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Pubmed-The early diagnosis of fibromyalgia in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

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The early diagnosis of fibromyalgia in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

 

Med Hypotheses. 2020 Jul 21;143:110119

Authors: Üçüncü MZ, Çoruh Akyol B, Toprak D

Abstract
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder worldwide, but the diagnosis is often overlooked. This study aimed to evaluate the sociodemographic characteristics of IBS patients and the relationship between IBS and fibromyalgia. 202 patients with gastrointestinal system complaints who were admitted to Sisli Hamidiye Etfal Trainnig and Research Hospital, Family Medicine Clinic were included in the study. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Fibromyalgia was associated with IBS in 26.7% of the participants. There was a positive correlation between the incidence of fibromyalgia and use of medication due to IBS, change in stool frequency, generalized pain, frequent illness, headache, excessive stress cancer anxiety , workforce loss due to IBS symptoms and fibromyalgia (p < 0.05). The presence of generalized pain, among IBS symptoms, caused the most robust increase in the likelihood of fibromyalgia (80%). The symptoms which were increasing the possibility of fibromyalgia were mostly generalized pain, high WHOQOL total score, family history of cancer, and loss of workforce at admission. IBS is a condition that affects the daily life quality of individuals and is often a condition that can be confused or associated with other diseases. Primary care physicians should approach patients holistically, especially in patients with generalized pain, family history of cancer, loss of workforce at admission, and more careful about fibromyalgia in patients with high WHOQOL total score. This awareness will increase the chances of early diagnosis and treatment of patients and will provide less cost but more effective treatment.

PMID: 32721811 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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