Jump to content
Advertisement

Advertisement

Pubmed-Chronic stress and poor sleeping habits are associated with self-reported IBS and poor psychological well-being in the general population


Health Reporter
 Share

Recommended Posts


Advertisement

BMC Res Notes. 2021 Jul 22;14(1):280. doi: 10.1186/s13104-021-05688-4.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present population-based study aimed to examine the association of chronic stress and sleeping difficulties with self-reported irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms past 2 weeks, and psychological well-being.

RESULTS: The Malmö Offspring Study included subjects from the general population to complete a questionnaire regarding sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors, and medical health. Experience of chronic stress during the past or past 5 years was reported. Sleeping patterns included sleeping quality, sleeping hours per day, sleeping onset difficulties, and wake-up frequency. The severity of GI symptoms was measured with the visual analog scale for IBS. Associations of stress and sleeping habits with IBS and GI symptoms were calculated by logistic regression and generalized linear model, adjusted for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. After exclusion of organic GI disorders or missing values, 2648 participants remained. Participants with self-reported IBS (n = 316) and GI symptoms (n = 459) were often women and smokers. After full adjustment, chronic stress past year was associated with GI symptoms (OR: 1.347; 95% CI 1.030-1.762), whereas stress past 5 years (OR: 1.415; 95% CI 1.058-1.892) and sleeping onset difficulties ≥ 3 times weekly (OR: 2.153: 95% CI 1.228-3.774) were associated with IBS. Stress, poor sleeping quality, sleeping onset difficulties, and IBS/GI symptoms were all associated with poor psychological well-being (p < 0.001).

PMID:34294119 | DOI:10.1186/s13104-021-05688-4

View the full article



Advertisement
Link to post
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...