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Pubmed-Self-reported Wheat Sensitivity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Healthy Subjects: Prevalence of Celiac Markers and Response to Wheat-free Diet


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J Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2021 Oct 30;27(4):596-601. doi: 10.5056/jnm20086.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) report food-related aggravation of symptoms. Wheat/gluten is one of the most commonly incriminated. We studied the prevalence of self-reported wheat sensitivity in patients with IBS and in a healthy population from a region in India consuming mixed-cereal diets, correlated it with serological and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) markers of celiac disease, and evaluated the response to a wheat-free diet.

METHODS: We surveyed 204 patients with IBS and 400 healthy persons for self-reported wheat sensitivity. Testing for IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase and HLA DQ2 or DQ8 was done in individuals who reported wheat sensitivity. Consenting persons with wheat sensitivity were put on wheat-free diet and monitored for symptom change.

RESULTS: Twenty-three of 204 patients with IBS (11.3%) and none of the healthy subjects self-reported wheat sensitivity. Of 23 patients, 14 (60.9%) were positive for HLA DQ2 or DQ8 and none for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody. After 6 weeks on wheat-free diet, all 19 participating patients reported clinical improvement; fewer patients had bloating, diarrhea, constipation, and easy fatigue.

CONCLUSIONS: Eleven percent of patients with IBS self-reported wheat sensitivity. None of them had positive celiac serology; 60.9% were positive for HLA DQ2 and DQ8, suggesting a possible genetic basis. All of them improved symptomatically on a wheat-free diet.

PMID:34642280 | DOI:10.5056/jnm20086

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