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Pubmed-Perceived Gastrointestinal Symptoms and Association With Meals in a French Cohort of Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome


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J Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2021 Oct 30;27(4):574-580. doi: 10.5056/jnm20201.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The aim of our study is to evaluate the association between meals and perceived gastrointestinal symptoms in real life in a French cohort of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients.

METHODS: This prospective cross-sectional observational study included patients from the French association (association des patients souffrant du syndrome de l'intestin irritable [APSSII]) of IBS. Data were collected on demographics, IBS subtype, dietary food, and meal-induced gastrointestinal symptoms from patient filled self-questionnaires or questionnaires.

RESULTS: Eighty-four patients with IBS were included; 82.3% female with a mean age of 46.9 ± 15.7 years. Each transit pattern subtype represented one-third of the population. Forty-five percent of patients had severe IBS according to IBS-Severity Scoring System; mean IBS Quality of Life score was 53.9 ± 18.3. Patients believed that food could trigger or exacerbate gastrointestinal symptoms in 73.3% and 93.4%, respectively. Eighty-nine percent had already tried diets, mostly lactose free diet and low fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols diet in 61.3% and 53.6% of cases. Thirty-nine percent of meals induced gastrointestinal symptoms. Meal-induced gastrointestinal symptoms were associated with severity and subtype but not with quality of life.

CONCLUSIONS: This study has confirmed the important link between gastrointestinal symptoms and food. Gastrointestinal symptoms induced by meals are frequent and associated with severity and IBS-diarrhea subtype. Our study also underlines patients' interest in food and diet. More knowledge is needed on food that triggers IBS symptoms but also on diet conditions in order to improve this condition.

PMID:34642277 | DOI:10.5056/jnm20201

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