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Pubmed-Positive psychological well-being: A novel concept for improving symptoms, quality of life, and health behaviors in irritable bowel syndrome


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Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2023 Jan 17:e14531. doi: 10.1111/nmo.14531. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Though a growing body of research suggests that greater positive psychological well-being in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be protective, existing brain-gut behavior therapies primarily target negative psychological factors. Little is known about how positive psychological factors in IBS relate to IBS symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), or adherence to key health behaviors, such as physical activity and diet modification. Accordingly, per the ORBIT model of behavioral treatment development for chronic diseases, we explored potential connections between psychological constructs and IBS symptoms, health behavior engagement (physical activity and dietary modification), and HRQoL in a qualitative study to inform the development of a novel brain-gut behavior therapy.

METHODS: Participants with IBS completed self-report assessments and semi-structured phone interviews about relationships between positive and negative psychological constructs, IBS symptoms, health behavior engagement, and HRQoL.

KEY RESULTS: Participants (n = 23; 57% female) ranged in age from 25 to 79 (mean age = 54). IBS subtypes were similarly represented (IBS-diarrhea [n = 8], IBS-constipation [n = 7], and IBS-mixed [n = 8]). Participants described opposing relationships between positive and negative psychological constructs, IBS symptoms, health behavior engagement, and HRQoL, respectively, such that experiencing positive constructs largely mitigated IBS symptoms, boosted health behavior participation, and improved HRQoL, and negative constructs exacerbated symptoms, reduced health behavior participation, and worsened HRQoL.

CONCLUSIONS AND INFERENCES: Participants with IBS linked greater positive psychological well-being to moderated IBS symptoms and better HRQoL and health behavior participation. An intervention to cultivate greater well-being may be a novel way to mitigate IBS symptoms, boost health behavior participation, and improve HRQoL in IBS.

PMID:36650705 | DOI:10.1111/nmo.14531

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