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Pubmed-Causal relationships between psychological disorders and functional gastrointestinal disorders: a bidirectional two-sample Mendelian randomization study


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Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2024 Jul 8. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000002825. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Observational studies have shown bidirectional associations between psychological disorders (e.g. depression and anxiety) and functional gastrointestinal disorders. However, whether the relationships are causal is uncertain. Here, we used a bidirectional two-sample Mendelian randomization method to investigate the association between psychological disorders and functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs).

METHODS: We obtained genome-wide association study summary statistics for two common psychological disorders: depression (170 756 cases) and anxiety (31 977 cases), as well as for three common FGIDs: functional dyspepsia with 6666 cases, constipation with 26 919 cases, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with 7053 cases. These summary statistics were retrieved from several publicly available genome-wide association study databases. The inverse variance weighted method was used as the main Mendelian randomization method.

RESULTS: Inverse variance weighted Mendelian randomization analyses showed statistically significant associations between genetically predicted depression and risk of functional dyspepsia [odds ratio (OR): 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-1.82], constipation (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.13-1.44), and IBS (OR: 1.51, 95% CI: 1.37-1.67). Genetically predicted anxiety was associated with a higher risk of IBS (OR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.10-1.17) instead of functional dyspepsia and constipation. In addition, genetically predicted IBS instead of functional dyspepsia and constipation was associated with a higher risk of depression (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.12-1.57) and anxiety (OR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.05-4.03).

CONCLUSION: Depression is a causal risk factor for three common FGIDs. A bidirectional causal relationship between IBS and anxiety or depression was also identified.

PMID:38973539 | DOI:10.1097/MEG.0000000000002825

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